Archive for the ‘Davis Bunn’s Novels’ Category

When You Feel Called to Step Out of Your Comfort Zone

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

The Turning By Davis BunnToday’s reader reviews of The Turning are by bloggers, Kathryn Eriksen and Lonzine Lee.

How Do You Make a Turning?

By Kathryn Eriksen, Walk With The Master blog

Have you ever been called to step out of your comfort zone…for no logical reason other than you felt a strong desire? If you followed that desire, what was the result? Did it benefit you and those around you?

What if that strong desire was actually God whispering for you to go…and take the turning? Puts a different spin on it, doesn’t it?

The message of The Turning is that you are not strong enough to go alone. Instead of asking God to solve the problem, turn to God so you can grow closer to him. It is a simple shift in perspective but a profound one. And that same shift is experienced by the characters, who also struggle to hear God’s response to their pleas.

The clash of good v. evil is portrayed vividly in the book. The power of the media is pitted against the power of God. Darkness seems to overtake everything, until one man’s soul lights up with God’s purpose. Nothing can stop him from doing God’s will. And in those moments of pure courage, he discovers his own will is the same as God’s.

And his life is never the same.

The Most Significant Davis Bunn Novel to Date!

By Lonzine Lee, I’m Just Asking blog

Here’s what I like about reading a Davis Bunn novel. It takes less than one minute to get pulled into the story. His characters are well-drawn. He really knows how to capture the voice of people (the gender, the ethnicity and the generation); and he provides more than one perspective.

The Turning, Davis Bunn’s latest book, is significant, gripping, heraldic, hopeful and intentional. I’ll just tell you point blank, you need to read it. There are so many directions I can go with this review, but I’m going to go the way of my heart. Imagine being inspired to perpetuate a viral mindset that revolves around the death of all hope. It is an invitation to entertain all that is dark, fearful, evil and devastating to the psyche and life of mankind. At heart, you are launching an attack against God, His Word and His people. Now imagine being invited by God Himself to be part of a team of individuals gathered to confront that viral message.

You are caught up in the fast pace of one man’s unsavory ambition to take down the church and then you are called to a front row seat to watch the Almighty’s strategy unfold. John, Alisha, Jenny, Ruth and Yussuf, the five men and women central to the story respond to God’s voice inviting them to “take the turning, and walk the unlikely road…and you will find Me there.” Each individual knew precisely what He wanted them to do, and they obeyed.

The scripture speaks of those without God being without hope. It also speaks to the hope that is ours in Jesus Christ. The story revolves around those two positions, with the adversarial camp seeking to capitalize on the hopelessness of this generation. It may seem like a small thing, but I believe it captures the essence of our current day societal mindset. Mr. Bunn heralds the message to those who choose to listen to get ready, for this same confrontation is being played out in social media today. Because that is so, I found it inescapable that I would also have to make a turning of my own before I finished the book. And I did.

Some may find this book “preachy.” It isn’t, it’s simply that it confronts the reader and challenges the comfort zone, even as it shows the love of God and the delineation between His Light and darkness. This is uncomfortable for some, outrageous and pushy for others. Why? It is because God is intentional and He wants His people to make His position clear to all. He desires that none should perish, so everyone gets a chance to accept or reject His love and His message of hope.

Even Trent, the ambitious young man in the story gets an invitation to turn toward hope. In this book, there is no happy ending, just a deep breath between one accomplished victory and the next onslaught. The adversary is not vanquished for good…yet. Hopefully this means a sequel.

What if God asked you, “Who will go for Me,” and you responded like the prophet Isaiah: “Here am I Lord, send me.” And then God said to you, “Take the turning, and walk the unlikely road. Take the turning, and you will find Me there.” Would you do it? Are you ready to take the turning?

A Reader’s Critique of ‘Lion of Babylon’

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Dottie writes:Lion of Babylon

I just finished Lion of Babylon, and while I appreciated the Christian theme throughout, I was a bit dismayed by some errors, which should have been caught by your editorial staff. Page 12: “…had tried repeatedly to effect a truce between…” The correct word is affect (verb tense), not effect, which is a noun.

And not to be picky, but 30 degrees C is 86 degrees F….and yes, you did say the temperature was approaching 90 degrees F….no points lost on that one, I suppose.

The plot was complex, but I was never able to get into a comfortable rhythm of reading. It seemed stilted and a bit disjointed, perhaps due to your use (over use, IMO) of word fragments rather than sentences. That, along with some odd punctuation here and there, seemed more to confound than to engage this reader.

I am starting Rare Earth tonight, and I hope to be won over to the legions of readers who enjoy your novels.

Dear Dottie,

Thank you so much for your thoughtful response. Though I must say I wish the first book of mine might have elicited a more wholehearted enthusiasm. Your points, however, are well taken. In case you’re interested, Library Journal did name Lion one of their Top Ten Titles—fiction and nonfiction combined—for 2011.

I do hope Rare Earth is more to your taste. It won the 2013 Christy Award for excellence in suspense fiction.

A Complete List of Books by Davis Bunn

Friday, June 6th, 2014

I love it when my readers help out!

Several years ago I stopped keeping track of the books I’ve had published. But apparently, one of my readers hasn’t. I’d like to thank Gary Gilmore for preparing and sharing this list of my books.

Gary writes:  “I know some of the books are out of print, but they are still in local libraries – where I found all of mine.”

Click below to open a PDF of all my published books… as well as a sneak preview of some that will be coming soon:

Davis Bunn – Complete List of Books PDF – updated June 2014

Please visit the Books page on my website for detailed information about my books in print.

Reader Question: Can You Explain the Ending of The Presence? (spoiler alert!)

Thursday, June 5th, 2014


Barbara writes:

I shared The Presence with three of my friends, and we all question the explosion at the end. Did we miss something? Was something implied? We felt the couple’s death was expected, but how did it occur?

Dear Barbara,

The Presence came out twenty years ago, and then was re-released ten years back, and I have not had an opportunity to talk about it for six or seven years now, though it still remains a personal favorite. So thank you for the chance to revisit this story.

To answer your question, my intention was to create a situation similar to what Paul received in his warning about his future direction. I knew from the very beginning that TJ was going to pay the ultimate sacrifice for his work, and that this was in a sense necessary for his quest. It was, I agree, totally risky. That the book went on to become a national bestseller within the Christian community was such a blessing, both to me and the publishers who gave me this chance.

Reader Mailbag: Spiritual Encouragement from Father Gregor in The Priceless Collection

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

The Priceless Collection
Florian's Gate by Davis Bunn The Amber Room by Davis Bunn Winter Palace by Davis Bunn

Schyrell writes:

I just finished The Amber Room and as usual I LOVED it. My next task is to order the third of the Priceless Collections series. As I’ve read the first two I have felt as though I’m extending my personal bible study. This is one of the main reasons I love your books. There are things in the stories that touch me right where I am.

I’m 65 and have never felt worthy of my gift for salvation. But Gregor put it so simply: I’m not worthy, but I am because of true LOVE—the love of a perfect Creator and His sacrifice through my beloved saviour.

And Jeffrey’s guilt for yearning to learn—another eye opener. God bless you, sir. Please continue to let God use you through the gift of writing He has blessed you with.

Dear Schyrell,

It has been remarkable for me personally, seeing The Priceless Collection reprinted after, let’s see, twelve years out of print. The series meant a great deal to me when they first came out, as the books represented a big step both in my artistic development and in my career as a novelist. I’m grateful that so many ‘new’ readers have responded to these stories, even though the events that drove me to write them—the fall of the Berlin Wall, the decline of the USSR’s hold over Eastern Europe, the rise of the first shoots of freedom for Poland since WWII—are now part of history.

Elaine writes:

Thank you for releasing your older books on Kindle! I was copying into my prayer journal this morning some profound and much needed “advice” from the wise Gregor and it occurred to me that although you are a brilliant man and a gifted writer, it is clear when the Holy Spirit sets words on your pages.

From the first “Davis Bunn” novel to the newest, then backtracking through these rereleased ones, I have been moved by something or more than one something each time! I’ve written many times over the years to tell you that, but this insight seemed newly birthed.

A recent series of events “which I have not brought upon myself” have rocked my “sense of order and balance and symmetry” to where I have had doubts, fears and anxieties assail me at night. I loved this: “At such times it is most important not to doubt in the dark what you have learned in the light.”

Your quotes from Gregor coincided amazingly well with the day’s Jesus Calling devotional about relying on the Unseen God when your senses want to tell you otherwise. Thank you for continuing to bless us with your talent and being obedient to the calling!

Dear Elaine,

I am sorry to read that you have been enduring some trials recently. I do hope and pray that by the time you read this, a calm has been restored, and your path recentered upon God’s compass heading.

I wish you every peace.

San writes:

I have been praying for some time that God will have many of your past writings re-released—there are audiences that desperately need the Light wrapped in each of your stories.

The Priceless Collection is one of my very favorites as well. Father Gregor’s faith, Jeffrey’s quest for truth and Tatya’s fragile healing continue to influence much of my beliefs and faith walk. Besides the fact I love the stories, I feel mentored as a writer each time I re-read your books.

A final compliment—last spring my husband and I relocated. This was our 17th move in 29 years of marriage (we are not in the military, though we are in the “army of the Lord”!). Before our move, we culled out our personal libraries and donated over 500 books to a college library. All your books (the 40 I have so far) made the cut to move with us. At our house, a Davis Bunn book is a definite “keeper.”

Dear San,

I so so appreciate your kind words regarding the re-release of the Priceless Collection.

For details and purchasing information about each book, visit:

Book 1: Florian’s Gate

Book 2: The Amber Room

Book 3: Winter Palace

Reviews of ‘The Turning’ by Male Readers

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

The Turning By Davis BunnIt has been said that readers of Christian fiction — and fiction in general — are over 80 percent female. I feel blessed to have a large and vocal male readership, as well. Perhaps that has something to do with the fact that I am male, and many of my protagonists are male.

Whatever the reason, I enjoy hearing from my male readers. Today, I’m featuring reviews of The Turning from five of them:

  1. Steve Hilton
  2. Daniel Leonard
  3. Mike Eagle
  4. Russ Hanley
  5. Rick Estep

A contemporary allegory of an eternal story

By Steve Hilton, Doc’s Doin’s blog

“Then He said to them, “My soul is exceedingly sorrowful, even to death. Stay here and watch with Me.”  He went a little farther and fell on His face, and prayed, saying, “O My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as You will.”  - Matthew 26:38-39 (NKJV)

A relationship with the Lord God Almighty is not for the faint of heart. It is not so much a series of tasks as it is a lifelong commitment which demands ones best at every instance. Five individuals are about to discover the truth of these words.

Five unique people. Five very different walks of life. Yet they have two things in common; they believe that they have heard the voice of God, and they have responded in obedience.

As John, Ruth, Alisha, Jenny and Yusuuf simultaneously arrive in New York for very different reasons, they are inextricably drawn together to the same hotel lobby. Led by the Spirit, introductions are made and the purpose for their meeting is revealed in a flash mob:  Hope Is Dead.

Trent Cooper has his priorities in order. Me, myself . . . and I. He lives with the fury of one who sees, and has been denied, his hearts desires. Always striving, Trent is never going to be content with a brass ring. Visionary, and with a clear understanding of his strengths and weaknesses, Trent Cooper will not rest until he has it all. Trent lays it all on the line for the one roll of the dice that will either make him . . . or break him. He doesn’t realize that in so doing, he’s already lost.

The Turning is a contemporary allegory of an eternal story; a story of rebellion and reconciliation, of romance and redemption. A story of sin and salvation, and the eternal struggle between the god of this world and the King of Kings. And while the adversary may wish you to believe that there is a pitched battle raging throughout the ages, and the outcome is precariously balanced on the edge of a knife . . . nothing could be further from the truth. One little word shall fell him.

5 stars, for a story that reveals the impossible . . . and makes it possible.

Life-Altering Message of Hope

By Daniel Leonard, Goodreads

Can God use you to do great and mighty things if you are:

  • Over 30?
  • Haven’t gone to Bible college?
  • Not up-to-date on the latest Christian music?
  • An ex-convict?
  •  Not hip on fashion?
  • Feeling inadequate?

The Bible gives many examples why none of the things I mentioned above can keep you from doing great and mighty things for God if your life is surrendered to Him. Bunn’s new book also does a fine job of illustrating this very Biblical point.

I believe there is a message of hopelessness being SHOUTED in the face of the people of the world more than ever. This is a dark atmosphere that God can and will show His light and power in huge way. God wants to use you and me, no matter our past and lack of worldly titles, pedigrees and accomplishments, to shine His light in the darkness and save the perishing! Make no more excuses–surrender to God and watch mighty, mighty things happen!

Read this book and take it to heart. If you do, you will not only realize how much Satan has successfully propagated a message of hopelessness, but that God can use simple people to conquer that message and give hope and salvation to all who are hopeless! This world will be radically different when ALL God’s people realize they can do mighty things for the Kingdom of God!

I don’t usually give books five stars, but the message of this book and author are too important not to. Thank you, Davis, for this timely message!

Here am I, send me!

By Mike Eagle, Goodreads

The story centers around five ordinary people from altogether different backgrounds.   The story is very well written and besides being a good story has a deeper spiritual message of hope in the direst circumstances.  The characters are all drawn toward the service to listening and being led to act on their calling from God.  Although I did not read this entire book at one setting, it would have been very easy to if time allowed, it’s that kind of book.

I would recommend this book for everyone.If you haven’t read books by Davis Bunn, then you are in for a treat.   Soon after reading this book, you will be searching out his other books to also read.

Beware. He’s done it again.

By Russ Hanley, Facebook

Davis Bunn’s newest novel, The Turning, will challenge and convict you. One reviewer wrote, “The Turning is the most refreshing and inspired page turner in recent years. It captures your heart, mind, and spirit”.

I couldn’t agree more, I find myself listening for God’s call and wanting and waiting to answer. Once you start reading, you’d better have time set aside, because this will be very hard to put down.

I particularly enjoyed the way this story drew me in with characters that were flawed in a way that was relatable. The characters were hardly fictional, and were people I’d like to know. In fact, they were like people, I do know. Davis Bunn told the story from both sides and even the antagonist, Trent Cooper, was a sympathetic character in the beginning. In many ways he was the embodiment of the American Dream, going from humble beginnings to the top of the corporate ladder. As the story went on, we saw how each decision and commitment he made further exposed his role in a diabolical plan.

The story’s heroes are five people from very different backgrounds and locations who have nothing in common, except their faith and the fact that each is plagued by a difficult damaged relationships that must be dealt with. God has spoken to each one convicting each one to take the initiative, to begin the healing and restoration of those relationships in preparation for the task God has called them for. When they’ve responded to God’s call, then He brings them together for the real reason He called them.

Our enemy, Satan, would like nothing better than for believers to be complacent in the face of efforts to gradually water down the influence of Godly morality in our society and to effect growing compromise with evil. In The Turning, Bunn does a masterful job dealing with the age-old topic of good versus evil. He weaves a fresh, new, and compelling story that will challenge every believer to be more aware of the continuing spiritual battle going on around us.
The Turning is fictional but it is also very much a devotional. It is a must read.

From A Man’s Perspective

By Rick Estep, Reviews from a Man’s Perspective blog

When you read Brandilyn Collins, you expect suspense.

When you read Wanda Brunstetter, you expect sweet Amish stories.

The great thing about picking up a novel by Davis Bunn, is that you never know what you are going to get.

Are you ever still enough to “hear” God speak to you? The five people in this story sure didn’t have any problem making a distinction between any still small voice in their head and the thundering voice of the Almighty. But would they follow it?

By doing so, they have opened up a difference in their lives, they’ve taken a path that is leading them to something more than they could ever imagine. By following this voice, they are allowing themselves to travel down a road that will require them to take a higher road between the moral right and the moral wrong.

Can their small band really go up against the powerhouse media conglomeration? Are they putting all their lives in danger? Is there a way to stand for what you believe in in the face of the society that we have become today? Turn off your TV and go BUY THIS BOOK!

The best part of this book, in my opinion, is the fact that it kept giving me a reason to read it. I love to get close to the end of a chapter and get that nudge that “one more chapter will be enough for tonight.” By the time you get to that “one more chapter,” you’re seeing the beginning of a new day and you’re finishing the book. This book is that way.

Mr. Bunn takes you down this journey and continues to entice you to read more. You can never get enough, and even at the end of it, you are hoping that there is more to be shared about the book. It was fascinating to me how Mr. Bunn brought the characters together, almost in a way that said, “I need you to listen and help me, but before you do that, there’s some baggage in your life that we need to reconcile.” The characters were everyday people from every day walks of life with every day sin in their lives and He was still able to use them to further His kingdom.

Is this a “guy’s book”? Hang onto your hat. This is a simple read, but it is a read that keeps you going, always wanting to read just a little further and never giving you a rest until you’ve turned the final page.

Reflections on Jesus, Evangelism, and Crossing Religious Barriers

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

Lion of Babylon by Davis BunnJohn writes:

I have recently discovered and read with much interest and a great deal of enjoyment several of your books. I was taken in particular with Lion of Babylon.

It seems to me that your key message here, or at least the message that I took home, was the desirability of all of usChristian, Jew, Muslim, whateverto concentrate on our “friendship” with Jesus, a spirit common to many religions, rather than on our belonging to any particular church or specific religion. This concept resonated deeply with meBUT, and there is always a but, how do I put this into practice? Here and now? In my own community, parish, diocese, city, before even thinking about the state, the nation, the world?

At present my starting upon such a task seems stymied by one major factor. Today, at least here in Australia, the notion of “finding Jesus,” or any other such equivalent, is always greeted with scorn and derision. I need first to break that mould, but so far I have no idea as to how. Might I be so bold as to ask if you have encountered the same problem? Have you any thoughts as to how to overcome that stifling psychological block? The rewards would be immense and far-reaching.

Dear John,

Thank you very much for your thoughtful and challenging note. I will attempt to respond in the spirit with which you have written.

First, the moral of the book, Lion of Babylon: There is a growing controversy within the evangelical community over what form ‘coming to Jesus’ must take, especially as it applies to communities of other belief systems. This formed the crux of my story. I wanted to show a world where Christians are in the minority, and our confrontational missionary system—whereby the penitents are required to ‘give up’ or ‘renounce’ before they can know Jesus, has resulted in relatively small numbers of people coming to life-affirming faith, and doing so mostly from the margins. This means that the vast majority of people who fervently follow another faith are simply discounted, or considered lost, or however you want to say it, basically they are not touched. I, and a growing number of younger evangelicals, find this simply unacceptable.

There is a second system, which the hardliners reject outright. In this, Jesus is introduced without any connection to the earthly religious system. It is simply Jesus. No denomination, no church, no organization, nothing. Jesus. It is NOT Jesus as a friend.

This note of yours was on this point in error. But how do you approach a concept that is wrapped in two thousand years of hostility with a person who is devoutly following a different faith? By introducing the points where there is harmony. And this lies at the crux, the very vortex, of why so many hardliners simply cannot accept what is happening. Because to speak to the issue of harmony, you must first accept that the other belief system has merit. You cannot denounce them as followers of some dark path and then turn around and say, ‘But really, you have some merit to your concept of divine truth.’

Do you see? You must first accept that the divine truth is to some degree present in their faith system. And this means, you must understand enough of their system to actually speak from knowing.

The basic concept of Jesus at this point is very simple, and equally controversial. You are in effect saying that all systems of faith have some truth. But—and here is the very big but—all other systems hold one trait in common. It is man who does the work. Man strives to lift himself up.

With Jesus, God has reached down, and is doing the heavy lifting.

This one truth, this one concept of eternal salvation, is open to all people, so long as you begin from the point of respect, harmony, friendship, peace, and an open hand.

It is NOT Jesus as friend.

But to arrive at a point where the concept of salvation is acceptable, you must approach this first as the friend. Do you see the difference? You are the open hand. Not Jesus. The transition comes when two things happen. First, they accept that you hold a difference because of what Jesus has done in your life. And second, when they move from reading about Jesus to experiencing the Holy Spirit’s gift. When the breath of God moves over their heart, then it is time for you to move forward.

Whether you are dealing with a different faith system, or New Age practitioners, or simply a community dominated by post-modern attitudes towards faith in general, the attitude must be the same. Unless you begin with an attitude of respect and understanding, in other words, unless you accept that there is a genuine fragment of truth and resonating significance to their interpretation of life, you will always face the barrier of scorn. Why should they respond to you any differently than how you in your heart see them? They are not lost. They are not scorned by God. They reject this outright.

And unless you begin by first accepting the validity of their viewpoint, you might as well be talking Arabic. The only people who will listen to what you have to say are those who have already rejected their former system. And this means, reducing your contact with the world to the margins.

As for what you can do in your own corner of the globe, let me share two things. First, we have found ourselves increasingly engaged in dialogue with fervent Muslims over what this book signifies. Most of it begins as an argument, and why not, since it’s all we as a faith have been doing for fifteen centuries. But it doesn’t have to end there.

Second, groups of readers have begun reaching out to the immigrant populations in their respective cities. The most remarkable success has been seen with the Somali population in Minnesota. I am amazed to even be writing this, but it is indeed happening.

‘The Turning': Recommended for Book Clubs

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

The Turning 300Two of today’s reader reviewers recommend The Turning for a book club discussion. You’ll hear from Sherry Bibb, Nadia Wiro, and Edward Arrington.

A Modern-Day David and Goliath Story

By Sherry Bibb, Tea and Poetry blog

What do you get when a money-driven corporate conglomerate is opposed by a small band of Christians united in their supernatural call and conviction to fully obey the prompting of God? This modern-day David and Goliath story is Davis Bunn’s newest thought-provoking novel.

A young ambitious advertising executive seizes his chance to play in the big leagues and impress his media mogul bosses with a stunningly comprehensive strategy to shape societal trends by exploiting hopelessness. But God is at work. Five individuals in different parts of the country hear God’s call to specific action. Their obedience to the first step leads them to an unexpected divine appointment where the five “accidentally” meet one another.

As the newest media barrage is made public these five lives merge and take a turn to stand against manufactured hopelessness with the message of true hope. The story builds slowly and becomes riveting as the conflict between good and evil escalates. I found the ending to be somewhat anticlimactic, but that too is more like real life.

The story has elements that are very relevant to society today and would make for wonderful family or book club discussion. For example, two questions that came to mind 1) With all of the outcry against “corporate greed” why are we unconcerned about entertainment corporations? It is a terrible thing when retirement funds are mismanaged and stolen, but do we care when the virtues and values of a generation are systematically stolen and replaced reaping terrible consequences in society? 2) How can I impact those around me by conscientious obedience to the promptings of the Holy Spirit and the clear message of Scripture?

The Turning is a compelling story and a worthwhile read.

I’ve recommended it for a summer book club discussion

By Nadia Wiro, Amazon

The Turning was my first Davis Bunn read. I’m not normally drawn to Christian fiction. But, Bunn’s characters are contemporary “real” people. Real, self-focused people who aren’t sure of their life’s purpose and who struggle both to hear God’s voice and then to respond to a call for action.

Is hope dead? That theme is what Trent Cooper, an advertising hot shot, wants society to subscribe to. His entire life’s dream and his livelihood are on the line for you to agree with his campaign against hope! But other major characters are thrown together to disprove that philosophy. Convinced otherwise, at first timidly, then full throttle, they are propelled to dissuade you from buying into Trent’s advertising ploy in support of his dead hope philosophy.

Bunn developed very distinct characters with their individual flaws and set of challenges, and each had his or her own specific incident that required a decision of “turning.” Then he threw the characters together for interaction within a joint mission. Once the characters were developed and I could keep them straight, I was drawn in to see how they would relate to each other and how the conflict of views with Trent’s campaign against hope would be resolved. Would there be a convincing argument for hope?

My first Bunn book, but I’ve already recommended it for a summer book club discussion.

If You Heard God Speak, Would You Take The Turning?

By Edward Arrington, Amazon

The message was unexpected but instantly recognizable. A voice resonated from a distance and somehow from within. Against all earthly logic, it carried a divine command. And five very different people knew they were summoned to obey. Their actions were demanding, but not particularly grand. Only later would they see a pattern emerge – one that links their tasks together and comes to challenge the cultural direction of the nation. They realize that one small personal response unveiled a new realm of moral responsibility. And this affirmation of everyday hope captures the attention of millions.

Even as they are being brought together, they have no idea evil forces are being set into motion that will seek to undermine their every effort to proclaim God’s message, forces that declare “hope is dead”. Worldly power and greed are at stake. Malicious elements align themselves to cast doubt on whether we can really believe that God speaks to people today. They work feverishly to dismiss all such superstitions and delusions. They attempt to cast them as misguided individuals who should not be allowed to cast our society back into the Dark Ages.

The public debate and media frenzy place an unprecedented spotlight on knowing and doing God’s will. The five encounter threats, but try to remain steadfast in their faith. Had God indeed imparted wisdom on selected individuals? Is this sweep of events part of his divine purpose? The movement may herald a profound renewal – one that some are calling The Turning…

Who were the five people to whom God spoke? They were people just like us: people who had made choices in the past that affected their daily lives. They were imperfect, flawed Christians living with the pain, struggles, and fears that were the consequences of their failures. Not a one of them felt worthy to be used of God in any special way. However, they were obedient to take the first step, The Turning. Others were willing to stand with them and see them through the difficulties that lay ahead as they sought to fulfill the mission set before them.

Davis Bunn weaves an amazing story of God using a small group of individuals to face off against the “Goliath” of worldly power and money to bring about His purposes. In a very believable plot, one that I could see unfolding in my mind’s eye, they face one difficult situation after another depending completely on God’s guidance. A real key message is that none of them has all the answers. One man is chosen as the spokesperson but God does not speak only to him. He works through them all in different ways using their unique abilities and talents. Were they tempted to give up? You bet. They quickly learned they could accomplish far more as they pulled together than they could do individually.

I highly recommend this book because it delivers a powerful message of God using His people to change lives for His glory. Davis Bunn helps the reader grapple with the question: What would I do if God spoke to me like this?

When God Calls the Unlikely

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

The Turning 300Today’s reader reviews of The Turning are by Amanda Brogan, Crystal Kupper, and Mary Dushel.

Calling the Unlikely

By Amanda Brogan, Walking the Narrow Way blog

Perhaps you’ve heard the voice before. That inexplicable urging deep within your heart and soul, not audible but just as clear as if it had been shouted to you from a bullhorn. The voice of a Divine Storyteller, nudging you to follow a path you never would have expected.

It is this kind of Divine calling that Davis Bunn writes about in his new “devotional fiction” novel The Turning.

A brooding businessman from Cleveland. A snobby choir leader from Baltimore. A beautiful young oriental woman torn between two major life decisions, and an Arab learning the Christian faith. Each one hears the same message from God. Each must face a unique task. Each must take a monumental step toward forgiveness, reconciliation, compassion … spiritual obedience.

Feeling God call them to New York, these spiritual misfits band together under the leadership of a well-known Christian author to battle a rising cultural enemy.

I love the fact that each of the protagonists is introduced as someone who we normally would not look to for spiritual guidance. Each character has baggage, yet God does not wait till their baggage is gone to call them. He calls them with dirty lives, and offers them progressive steps of obedience to follow. Yet with each step, hearts are rearranged, maturity deepens, and the characters begin to take bigger and bolder steps of faith.

Davis shows us through these characters that we don’t have to be spiritual giants for Christ to call us. We simply need to be open to hearing His voice. He’ll meet us in that spot where calling and action collide.

Interesting, relevant read

By Crystal Kupper, on her blog

I had just slogged through two really awful books (coincidentally, both for my local book club) and I was very ready for a change. Thankfully, The Turning restored me to my normal love of turning pages gently instead of phwapping them shut in frustration.

Of Bunn’s recent works, this is definitely one of his best. I really enjoyed the character development, especially the insight into the antagonist, and was quite sad when the book ended. That’s the only reason I took off a star; I wanted more!

Hope is [Not] Dead

By Mary Dushel, Goodreads

“The fastest growing profit center within the entertainment industry is dystopia… The Generation Xers and the Millennials fundamentally disagree with the assumption that tomorrow is a better day. They reject the notion that the future holds greater promise.”

“Hope is dead.”

And, I promise, from there the book gets better.

These quotes are the beginnings of a marketing campaign that becomes the focus of Davis Bunn’s lastest novel, The Turning. The story begins with one of the country’s largest entertainment corporations planning this “hopeless” marketing strategy, including movies, books, music. But God has taken exception to this campaign and has decided to meet it head on. Five people are chosen and spoken to, directly, by God and sent to make the point that as long as God is alive and well and risen, hope cannot be dead.

This book is a well-written, fast-paced story. I found the characters to be nicely developed. I read books for their characters and I judge most books based on whether I would like to know the characters. These characters seemed real to me. They were multi-dimensional. The evil corporate types were not pure evil, but rather, though certainly ambitious, showed some level of humanity.

The characters who were doing God’s work were also multi-faceted. This task was not coming easily for any of them. They lamented what was given up for this task; they showed fear of being able to handle what was being asked of them. It felt like how I would react if something of this magnitude was asked of me.

The best part of this book is that it leaves you thinking.

Would I be able to drop everything and embark on such a mission, if asked?

Am I, as a consumer, contributing to this bleak outlook that is so prevalent today?

What can I do to help change things?

All worth thinking about.

Radio Interview: Writing and the Spiritual Life

Monday, May 5th, 2014

I was recently a guest on Moody Radio’s Midday Connection show. The hosts and I discussed how God has worked in my life to prepare me for a career in writing. I hope you’ll be encouraged to learn that “overnight success” is highly overrated. Rather, hard and discipline in your craft can pay off.

Click here to listen to the show:

Midday Connection – Moody Radio

Learn more about Midday Connection and listen to their many amazing broadcasts.